NEMO’S SECRET – The Nautilus

by ODIAN GAMES; BIGFISH

Jud’s Game Rating:

Graphics ****  Player participation (PP) *****  Satisfaction Factor (SF) ****

Frustration Factor (FF) **  Fair Play (FP) ***

This is quite an entertaining Game – it must be – I bought it. lol  Anyway it has the usual Basic Options , and it offers a Tutorial at the Start of Play – worth doing as I always say for a new Game – you never know what little twists there might be in a Game.  it’d be a pain to discover halfway through that you were supposed to be collecting something at each scene.

The Graphics are nice and clear – except for the Hidden Object sites which are a little fuzzy, more so in some than others depending upon the location.  You can play in Relaxed Mode as well.  There is an Inventory bar that opens automatically when you click an area that requires it.

You get a ticket tape message (from Captain Nemo) telling you your tasks as they arise, and where you need to go next.  You do have to work it out for yourself once you get to the next location.  Plus there is quite a lot of backing and forthing, to-ing and fro-ing, until you move to the next task and level.  Unfortunately, if you click too many times you are punished by the cursor smoking and hissing for a while – totally unnecessary.

As you find the HOs you find that you are actually tidying the location – some of the items will go into your Inventory, while others relocate themselves within the scene.  This can be a bit disconcerting, especially if there are multiple objects of a kind to find.  You find you keep clicking on ones you have already found and get the ‘You have already found this object’ message.  A little FF.

This Game is quite high in the PP – you have to locate, then repair the submarine, The Nautilus, so that you can bring it to the surface and sail it away to the ‘To be continued’ ending.  This involves putting out fires, preparing food and cooking with no recipe, rebuilding generators, welding the sub’s hull underwater, constructing navigation equipment, repairing the usual fuse boxes and so on.

Finally the Puzzles vary from cool, to tedious.  It is worth persevering with most of them – if you have the time – but if not, there is always the Skip button.  Some players believe that using the Skip button or the Walkthroughs and Hints to give you a nudge is wrong – that they shouldn’t be allowed.  That is fine for them – they can play the game however they wish.  But I think that it is good to have it on hand.  A player can be as disciplined or relaxed as they wish to be.  Besides, there is nothing worse for the blood pressure than sitting fully FF and getting nowhere.  If a nudge gets you moving again, then the next time you play the game – unless you have left too much time between plays, or you have short term memory loss – you will have a more successful and enjoyable experience.  And that surely is the whole point in playing computer games!

I confess – I had to use the Skip button myself during this game on a couple of Puzzles – I couldn’t activate the Electronic Deterent System the first time, but managed the co-ordinates of it the second time.

Anyway, this is a good game to play, quite SF, and I recommend it for all.

(C)  Copyright  Jud House  11/10/2011

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